80’s in November! Indian Summer? And of course, a recipe I found!

 

7a012dd5d244761d0b1b20fcff687eccWHEN IS INDIAN SUMMER?

Here are criteria for an Indian summer:

  • As well as being warm, the atmosphere during Indian summer is hazy or smoky, there is no wind, the barometer is standing high, and the nights are clear and chilly.
  • A moving, cool, shallow polar air mass is converting into a deep, warm, stagnant anticyclone (high pressure) system, which has the effect of causing the haze and large swing in temperature between day and night.
  • The time of occurrence is important: The warm days must follow a spell of cold weather or a good hard frost.

The conditions described above must occur between St. Martin’s Day (November 11) and November 20. For over 200 years, The Old Farmer’s Almanac has adhered to the saying, “If All Saints’ (November 1) brings out winter, St. Martin’s brings out Indian summer.”

WHY IS IT CALLED INDIAN SUMMER?

Why is Indian summer called Indian summer? There are many theories. Some say it comes from the early Algonquian Native Americans, who believed that the condition was caused by a warm wind sent from the court of their southwestern god, Cautantowwit.

The most probable origin of the term, in our view, goes back to the very early settlers in New England. Each year they would welcome the arrival of a cold wintry weather in late October when they could leave their stockades unarmed. But then came a time when it would suddenly turn warm again, and the Native Americans would decide to have one more go at the settlers. “Indian summer,” the settlers called it. Watch a video from Editor-in-Chief Judson Hale about the origin of Indian Summer.

 

cinnamon-applesauce-recipe_full_width

INDIAN SUMMER APPLESAUCE

INGREDIENTS
4 quarts (1/2 peck) apples
3 or 4 purple plums, pitted
2 cups sugar
juice from 1/2 to 1 lemon, to taste
cinnamon
nutmeg
INSTRUCTIONS
Wash and quarter apples and plums. (No need to peel or core apples.) Place in a large pot and add 2 cups water. Cover and boil until apples are soft and the peels are falling off. Add sugar. Simmer another couple of minutes, until sugar is dissolved. Pour by small amounts into a food mill or other sieve, and press out the applesauce, discarding peels, seeds, and cores. Stir lemon juice, cinnamon, and nutmeg into applesauce.
YIELD:
2 quarts

Source: The Old Farmer’s Almanac (of course 🍎)

 

 

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