Sharing A Delicious Dish – Baked apples for Christmas

From Cooking without Limits, this dish not only looks amazing, but can you just imagine the way the kitchen will smell when you make this? Heavenly! I can’t wait to try this out. I’ll actually be making it next month because I get off easy and am not the cook this year 😉

Apples, cinnamon, honey and walnuts. This is the smell of Christmas in the kitchen. Pure heaven. Recipe can be found here… Baked apples for Christmas

Pumpkin Gingerbread Pie

Easy and Cruelty Free Pie From Making Thyme For Health , Sarah’s recipes are nothing short of amazing!

Vegan Pumpkin Gingerbread Pie- a simple recipe for ginger-spiced pumpkin pie that’s made in a blender and cooked in a gingersnap crust …

Recipe For: Vegan Pumpkin Gingerbread Pie

Coconut Oil & A Recipe

coconut-oil

 

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COCONUT OIL PIECRUST

Ingredients:
  • 1 1/2 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1/4 teaspoon fine sea salt
  • 3 ounces (about 1/2 cup) refined solid (not liquid) coconut oil
  • 8 tablespoons ice water

Place flour and salt a food processor and pulse briefly to combine, or combine by hand in a large bowl. Add coconut oil and pulse until mixture resembles coarse meal, making sure there are no large pieces of coconut oil remaining. Or, cut coconut oil in by hand with 2 table knives or grate coconut oil into the flour mixture using a box grater.

Add ice water a couple of tablespoons at a time, and continue to pulse, or mix by hand with a fork, just until dough begins to come together.

Turn dough out onto a cutting board or a smooth surface and form into a flattened disc. Wrap with plastic wrap and refrigerate at least an hour or overnight. Roll out dough on a lightly floured surface when ready to use.

Pumpkin Season

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 Pumpkin Puree

Tip: Choose the lighter colored pie pumpkins or what they call sugar pumpkins, they are sweet and less watery than the orange ones you usually buy to carve..

Cut the top from the pumpkin and scrape out the stringy membranes and seeds.
Cut the pumpkin into large pieces and place in a roasting pan.
Pour ½ cup water into the bottom of the pan and cover with foil.
Bake 45-60 minutes or until pumpkin is soft and easily pierced with a fork.
Scrape the soft pulp from the skin into a food processor or blender and puree.
Leftover pumpkin puree may be frozen in an airtight container for up to 12 months.
Roast Pumpkin Seeds
Rinse seeds under cold water and pick out the pulp and strings.
Place seeds in a single layer on a non-stick baking sheet and, if desired, sprinkle with your choice of no-salt seasonings.
Bake at 225 degrees F. until lightly toasted, about 45 minutes, checking and stirring frequently.
Sprinkle on salads, mix into healthy baked recipes or use as a topping for soups and entrees.

 

Cinnamon & Sea Salt Roasted Pumpkin Seeds

2 cups pumpkin seeds
3 Tbsp coconut oil
2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp all spice
1/4 tsp coarse sea salt

Preheat over to 350 degrees.

In a strainer, wash the seeds until all the guts are washed away. Let dry for 20 minutes over a paper towel to absorb excess water.

In a mixing bowl, toss seeds with coconut oil to coat. Spread evenly in a baking pan (use one with sides, like a brownie pan, to make stirring easier) and bake for 45 minutes, stirring occasionally.

Remove from heat and toss with cinnamon, all spice and salt. Serve immediately or store in an air-tight container.

rowofpumpkins

 

PLANTING, GROWING, AND HARVESTING PUMPKINS

Whether you use them for carving or cooking, pumpkins do not disappoint.

Note that pumpkins do require a lot of food and a long growing season (generally from 75 to 100 frost-free days) so you need to plant them by late May in northern locations to early July in extremely southern states.

Do not plant this tender vegetable until all danger of frost has passed and the soil is warmed, as the seedlings will be injured or rot. (See the Almanac.com/Gardening page for frost dates.)

That said, pumpkins are easy to maintain if you have the space.

Here’s how … Farmer’s Almanac