G.I.S.H.W.H.E.S. 2017

It’s been forever since I blogged, or at least that’s how it’s felt since my birthday. I’ve been busy doing things and stuff …

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What things and stuff? G.I.S.H.W.H.E.S. was one! Sadly this may be the last year Misha Collins will be doing the greatest scavenger hunt/random acts of kindness event EVER. BUT, I just saw this posted on his Facebook wall. “We create, therefore we live. It’s been a great ride, guys. Saddle up… I can’t wait to tell you where we’re going next. #gishwhes” So hopefully we will be up to more shenanigans next year!!

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G.I.S.H.W.H.E.S. – What is it?


“g.i.s.h.w.h.e.s. (which stands for the Greatest International Scavenger Hunt the World Has Ever Seen) is a 7-time Guinness World Record breaking scavenger hunt hosted by Misha Collins that you can compete in from anywhere in the world (even from your own home!). 
Many of the participants claim the Hunt is a life-changing experience that either pulled them out of their shell and completely changed their lives, or drove them insane… many others say it’s simply a great way to spend a week of their summer (or winter for those Gishers on the other half of the planet).”

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I was on team “Birdhouse In Your Soul” and we spent a week doing good deeds, showering love on people and doing random acts of silliness. I didn’t have time to accomplish many tasks, but what I did finish meant a lot to me and gave birth to a new regular volunteering task I plan to pick up. So what did I do?

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💜 I was abducted by aliens who were searching for specific traits for their specimens. Mine was my empathy and I was abducted in Virginia Beach, VA. This was silly. And I don’t do silly well, or often. But if I were abducted, this was why my hubby thought they would grab me, my empathy. 💙

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💜 I wrote a Haiku. My Haiku was for my Ippo. She got sick on my birthday last year and sadly lost her battle within a few weeks. This was a difficult project to undertake. I was an emotional mess. But I knew it was meant for this moment. It’s now another moment in my healing process. I miss her enormously. 💙

💜 I visited a large military ship (the Wisconsin) and held up a sign for all to see. A thank you to all who serve and served to protect our country. There weren’t many people there, but it still meant a lot to be there and reflect on all who give of themselves for others. 💙

💜 I decorated and delivered a cake with a message to someone(s) that I’ve always wanted to say. Mine I was lucky enough to do on my birthday, bringing my own cake. But decorated with “Thanks For Being My Friends” and presenting it as a surprise. It ended up being one of my most meaningful birthdays ever. And I plan to make it a tradition now every year to do an act of gratitude to celebrate my day 💙

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💜 I planted a bee loving plant and pollinated it wearing a bee costume (thank you INKnBURN!). My hubby thought I was supposed to do it by booty dancing. My team all agreed, some foot action was required. 💙

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💜 At a local laundromat I used decorated envelopes to leave enough for a wash and dry for three people. This is another I plan to do again in the future. The people in the laundromat just gave us funny looks, unsure what we were doing. And it made it all the better knowing their smiles when they picked up envelopes after we left 💙

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💜 And lastly, hubby and I took some non perishable food donations to a local youth shelter. They help kids who are from abusive homes and runaways. This meant more than I even knew it would, I walked out teary eyed and happy to find out that not only do they accepts monetary and food/other physical donations, but they need occasional volunteers too. They take the kids on outings and need help with the outings so the kids are safe and rules are being followed, etc… They had actually just returned from visiting a horse rescue. That rescue also takes in the abused and abandoned. My heart was bursting.  I don’t talk about it publicly much, but I was abused and emotionally neglected for most of the years before my 14th birthday. My mother abused alcohol and prescription meds and me. She also verbally abused a lot of other family members through the yearsThis was important for me, a random act of kindness for myself retroactive 💙

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A BIG thank you to a great team! And a HUGE thank you to Misha Collins for putting his heart on his sleeve and becoming involved with making the world a better place through art, silliness, and random acts of kindness and love 

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Random Acts Of Kindness

 

 

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Fotor1227164335I’ve been a RAKtivist for a few years now. And I usually don’t publicize my random acts. Many of which are either through volunteer work, or donations but I think it’s a crucial piece of personal development and social development if we take part. Of course people do kind things all the time on their own without having a group, or movement to tell them to do so. But the act of “joining” in and of itself serves at that little reminder as we start to get bogged down with our own busy days to stop and take a moment to reach out in some small way, big or small, to make a positive impact in the world we share with one another.

 

 

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And stop by the Random Acts Of Kindness Website and see if you’d like to join, just click the button below!

 

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Christmas Story: For the Man Who Hated Christmas

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Christmas Story:
For the Man Who Hated Christmas
By Nancy W. Gavin

It’s just a small, white envelope stuck among the branches of our Christmas tree. No name, no identification, no inscription. It has peeked through the branches of our tree for the past ten years.

It all began because my husband Mike hated Christmas. Oh, not the true meaning of Christmas, but the commercial aspects of it—overspending and the frantic running around at the last minute to get a tie for Uncle Harry and the dusting powder for Grandma—the gifts given in desperation because you couldn’t think of anything else.

Knowing he felt this way, I decided one year to bypass the usual shirts, sweaters, ties and so forth. I reached for something special just for Mike. The inspiration came in an unusual way.

Our son Kevin, who was 12 that year, was on the wrestling team at the school he attended. Shortly before Christmas, there was a non-league match against a team sponsored by an inner-city church. These youngsters, dressed in sneakers so ragged that shoestrings seemed to be the only thing holding them together, presented a sharp contrast to our boys in their spiffy blue and gold uniforms and sparkling new wrestling shoes.

As the match began, I was alarmed to see that the other team was wrestling without headgear, a kind of light helmet designed to protect a wrestler’s ears. It was a luxury the ragtag team obviously could not afford.

Well, we ended up walloping them. We took every weight class. Mike, seated beside me, shook his head sadly, “I wish just one of them could have won,” he said. “They have a lot of potential, but losing like this could take the heart right out of them.” Mike loved kids—all kids. He so enjoyed coaching little league football, baseball and lacrosse. That’s when the idea for his present came.

That afternoon, I went to a local sporting goods store and bought an assortment of wrestling headgear and shoes, and sent them anonymously to the inner-city church. On Christmas Eve, I placed a small, white envelope on the tree, the note inside telling Mike what I had done, and that this was his gift from me.

Mike’s smile was the brightest thing about Christmas that year. And that same bright smile lit up succeeding years. For each Christmas, I followed the tradition—one year sending a group of mentally handicapped youngsters to a hockey game, another year a check to a pair of elderly brothers whose home had burned to the ground the week before Christmas, and on and on.

The white envelope became the highlight of our Christmas. It was always the last thing opened on Christmas morning, and our children—ignoring their new toys—would stand with wide-eyed anticipation as their dad lifted the envelope from the tree to reveal its contents. As the children grew, the toys gave way to more practical presents, but the small, white envelope never lost its allure.

The story doesn’t end there. You see, we lost Mike last year due to dreaded cancer. When Christmas rolled around, I was still so wrapped in grief that I barely got the tree up. But Christmas Eve found me placing an envelope on the tree. And the next morning, I found it was magically joined by three more. Unbeknownst to the others, each of our three children had for the first time placed a white envelope on the tree for their dad. The tradition has grown and someday will expand even further with our grandchildren standing to take down that special envelope.

Mike’s spirit, like the Christmas spirit will always be with us.

Source: Woman’s Day 2009

Transforming from within

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Sometimes I need to get out of my own headspace

I am by nature a giver and a nurturer but when going through times of stress I regress and become focused on self and my own problems too hard and for too long. To break myself free of being caught up in my own drama, I need a set plan. I need guidance to refocus on what’s important in life, or to focus on small things that make the world a better place.

I am a RAKtivist (Random Acts Of Kindness) and have been for about 10 years. I used to be a blog fairy and spread love on peoples blogs, especially to those who are trying in their small way to make positive change in the world. I work with the RWB, helping to enrich veterans lives through physical activity and to become closer to our community. I volunteer with the Virginia State Parks to help preserve a place for nature in all it’s glory within the confines of a city. I have volunteered with the Food Bank, The Ronald McDonald House and several animal rescues here locally.

I think these things help us to grow from within. They help us to even reach out to people we may have never met in our normal day to day life. I think these acts are an important part of keeping our sense of humanity in this  digital world.

Today I stumbled upon Kindness 365 and want you to go check it out.Or check out any of the links I posted below, find what fits you. It’s not just a “feel good” experience (although it will have that effect), it’s actually fun too!. I think some of the most defining transformation we can have in our lives is when it comes from within. It has a kind of ripple effect and extend through everything else in our lives.

Kindness 365

Team RWB

Random Acts Of Kindness

Volunteers-In-Parks

ASPCA

Best Friends Society

Ronald McDonald House Volunteers

Feeding America – Find Your Local Food Bank

do good – feel good – volunteer

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