Wild & Free

Tink

Last night we made the very painful decision to let our Tinka Belle cross the rainbow bridge. Her breast cancer had returned with a vengeance. It swiftly and aggressively took hold of her. It moved so fast there was nothing any medicine or treatment could do. Not even to slow it down. It was the hardest decision, but right decisions are not always the easy ones. She was always a proud, dignified and independent girl. Living in a cone and in a cancer riddled body, being forced medications, unable to eat and under supervision on and off every day for almost 2 months, while tumors grew in size and number and seeped blood, was not life for her. She was broken and beaten by a viscous unrelenting disease. CANCER SUCKS!

When we came outside to the car after the vet, this incredible sunset was in front of us. We watched as the sun set and the full moon rose. And I began the missing of her. 

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My heart is broken into a million little pieces again, as it does whenever one of our furbabies transition ahead of us. 

I CANNOT STRESS THIS ENOUGH
SPAY and NEUTER your furkids.

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A study at Brown University on spay and neutering reported:
“In males, neutering decreases the chances of developing prostatic disease and hernias, and eliminates the chances of developing testicular cancer. It also reduces problems with territorial and sexual aggression, inappropriate urination (spraying) and other undesirable male behaviors.

 

In Females, spaying decreases the incidence of breast cancer (the rate goes down to almost zero if the spaying is done before the first heat cycle!). It eliminates the chance of developing a serious and potentially fatal infection of the uterus experienced by many mature unspayed animals (pyometra). Spay surgery also eliminates the heat cycle and associated mood swings and undesirable behaviors, messy spotting (in dogs) and the attraction of all available males to your yard.”

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FACTS
Over 90 percent of feline mammary tumors are malignant, meaning they grow in an invasive fashion and spread to distant sites in the body. This is in contrast to dogs, where only about 50 percent of mammary tumors are malignant.
Tumors tend to affect older, unspayed female cats, but all cats, including males, are at risk.
 
The age at which a female cat is neutered plays a role in protecting against tumor development, with the greatest benefit seen for kittens spayed before 6 months of age, who have a 91 percent reduction in risk compared to non-spayed cats. Spaying between six months and one-year results in an 86 percent reduction in risk, spaying between 1-2 years leads to an 11 percent reduction in risk, and spaying after age two does not reduce the risk of mammary cancer development at all.
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Now I try and keep busy the rest of the day. Tonight I’m participating in a Full Moon Release Meditation & Drum Circle. By my heart is broken. I’ve always adopted old, broken, unwanted furbabies and although it fills me with gratitude and a full heart when I do, this is a part of that. The letting go. She needed me to be strong for her, so I was. 
I will forever miss her head boops, her independent & proud nature, and the fact that no matter how long she had lived off the streets she never let us completely tame her. I always knew she was a child of the moon, now she truly is wild and free again, gone but never really gone. 

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